Uganda

Gay Rights: A World of Inequality

Publication Date: 
September 15, 2011
Source: 
The Guardian
Two teenagers are publicly hanged under anti-gay laws in Mashhad, Iran, in 2005. Photograph: PA


Gay people still live in fear in many countries around the world – prejudice, torture and execution are common. Can two new legal and diplomatic campaigns change attitudes?

Last Thursday, , sexual intercourse between two men. The case is considered extreme even by Iranian standards, because while the death penalty is in place for homosexuality, it is usually enforced only when there is a charge of assault or rape alongside it; the accusations in these three cases were of consensual sex.

Widow Cleansing: Harmful Traditional Practice

Publication Date: 
April 13, 2009
Source: 
Isiria
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Violence against women still is universal, and while it has many roots, especially in cultural tradition and customs, it is gender inequality that lies at the cross-cultural heart of violent practices. Violence against women is deeply embedded in human history and its universal perpetration through social and cultural norms serves the main purpose of reinforcing male-dominated power structures.

The calls for “equal and inalienable rights” for all people, “without distinction of  any kind.”

Intimate Partner Violence: High costs to Households and Communities

Publication Date: 
January, 2011
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ICRW and its partners, Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies (BIDS), Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC) in Uganda and Hassan II University in Morocco, with support from UNFPA, undertook a three-country study in Bangladesh, Morocco and Uganda to estimate the economic costs of intimate partner violence at the household and community levels, where its impact is most direct and immediate. The focus on intimate partner violence was motivated by the fact that this is the most common form of violence against women. A household and community level analysis helps to shed light on intimate partner violence's relationship to both household economic vulnerability and the extent to which scarce public resources for essential health, security and infrastructure services are diverted due to such violence.

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Indigenous women shape women’s rights

Publication Date: 
June 3, 2011
Source: 
FPP


The voices of indigenous women have repeatedly reminded national governments, human rights bodies and other national and international fora that their human rights as women need to be addressed as the rights of indigenous women. Accordingly, indigenous women have called on the United Nations bodies and processes related to women to adopt the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples “as a minimum standard in the fulfilment and enjoyment of rights by indigenous women”.

Uganda: Gay activist Kasha Jacqueline Nabagesera granted Martin Ennals award

Publication Date: 
May 4, 2011
Source: 
BBC
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Ugandan gay activist Kasha Jacqueline Nabagesera has been given the prestigious Martin Ennals rights award.

The 10 organisations which make up the award jury said she was courageous and faced harassment because of her work. Homosexual acts are illegal in Uganda, and can be punished by long jail terms.

Ugandan Anti-Homosexuality Bill is Anti-Human Rights and Anti-Democratic: ACT NOW TO STOP IT!

The Global Campaign to Stop VAW in the name of "Culture"  (VNC Campaign) extends our unequivocal solidarity with the Ugandan lesbians, gays and other progressive citizens that continue to fight against the Anti-Homosexuality Bill in Uganda.  The Bill is explicitly anti-human rights and anti-democratic and contravenes the African Charter on Human and People's Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), and other international human rights treaties to which Uganda is a party.  National dialogue and understanding of homosexuality in Uganda is widely known to being strongly influenced by American Evangelical Christians, some of whom visited the country and took part in an anti-homosexuality conference that immediately preceded the filing of the anti-homosexuality bill in the parliament in 2009. David Kato, the LGBT rights activist whose extra-judicial killing caused  worldwide public outcry was one of the main advocates campaigning against the bill, and received numerous death threats for his activism.

Uganda: HIV/AIDS Challenges with Child Marriages, Polygamy, Civil War

Publication Date: 
April 24, 2011
Source: 
Women's E-News
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In northern Uganda, daughters with limited understanding of HIV/AIDS are married off at young ages into polygamous households still struggling with the legacy of a brutal 16-year civil war. The practice is a recipe for rapid disease transmission.

VNC condemns the murder of David Kato

Publication Date: 
January 31, 2011
Source: 
Violence is Not our Culture campaign
Violence is not our culture


The Violence is Not out Culture campaign condemns the brutal murder on 26 January 2011 of LGBT human rights defender, David Kato, of Uganda and extends its condolences to his colleagues at Sexual Minorities Uganda (SMUG). David was a long term activist for rights based on sexual orientation and gender identity in Uganda, and was a highly respected and admired human rights defender within his community and worldwide.

Ugandan paper calls for gay people to be hanged

Publication Date: 
October 21, 2010
Source: 
The Guardian
Source: AP


Human rights activists have warned that the lives of gay people in are in danger, after a newspaper published a story featuring the names and in some cases photographs of 100 homosexuals under the headline "Hang Them".

Widow "Cleansing" Tradition - Rights Violation

Publication Date: 
April 13, 2009
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Widow cleansing dates back centuries and is practiced for example in countries like Zambia, Kenya, Malawi, Uganda, Tanzania, Ghana, Senegal, Angola, Ivory Coast, Congo and Nigeria. It gives a nod to a man from the widow’s village or her husband’s family, usually a brother or close male relative of her late husband, to force her to have sex with him – ostensibly to allow her husband’s spirit to roam free in afterlife.